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Latin America Oscar Bids Explore Indigenous Life

Latin America Oscar Bids Explore Indigenous Life

Posted by PanamericanWorld on October 01, 2015

Twelve Latin American films exploring socio-economic issues, including border politics, homosexuality, domestic work and Indigenous lives will be competing for the 2016 Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film.

Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, México, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Dominican Republic, Uruguay and Venezuela are the countries who hope to bring home the golden statue that has only been won twice by a Latin American country.

With the film “Relatos Salvajes,” Wild Stories, Argentina earned the trophy in 2009 for the second time.

Mexico seeks to break this historical record with “600 miles,” which narrates the story of a young Mexican man that finds himself struggling in the world of arms trafficking between the U.S. and Mexico while under the watchful eye of an agent on the other side of the border.

The often-neglected lives of domestic workers come in the spotlight in the Brazilian film “The Second Mother.” The Oscar hopeful, produced by Anna Muylaert, brings to the screen the struggle of Val, a low-income woman from an impoverished Brazilian region that abandons her child to move to Sao Paolo and work as a housekeeper.

The Dominican Republic opted for “Sand Dollars,” a film that centers a relationship of convenience between a white French woman and a female Dominican sex worker.

The film, its website states, reveals the “contradictions as having to pay for company, to pay to solve everyone’s problems, the wish to belong, to be helpful and useful, and the impotence of not knowing how and to always feel like an outsider.”

The brutal reality of the exploitative relationship between Panama and the United States is brought to life in the documentary “Box 25.” Based on 114 recently discovered letters written by men that built the Panama Canal, the meticulously-researched film documents the intimately personal experiences of torturous working conditions, rampant discrimination, illness as well as these men’s hopes and dreams.

Meanwhile, Venezuela and Colombia sent in two films narrating the lives of Indigenous peoples.

“Embrace of the Serpent” is Colombia’s Oscar hopeful, a story on the forty-year-long search for a sacred healing plant that brings together two U.S. American scientists and an Amazonian shaman who is the last survivor of his tribe.

​Twelve Latin American films exploring socio-economic issues, including border politics, homosexuality, domestic work and Indigenous lives will be competing for the 2016 Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film.

Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, México, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Dominican Republic, Uruguay and Venezuela are the countries who hope to bring home the golden statue that has only been won twice by a Latin American country.

With the film “Relatos Salvajes,” Wild Stories, Argentina earned the trophy in 2009 for the second time.

Mexico seeks to break this historical record with “600 miles,” which narrates the story of a young Mexican man that finds himself struggling in the world of arms trafficking between the U.S. and Mexico while under the watchful eye of an agent on the other side of the border.

RELATED: Argentina Creates Indigenous Film School

The often-neglected lives of domestic workers come in the spotlight in the Brazilian film “The Second Mother.” The Oscar hopeful, produced by Anna Muylaert, brings to the screen the struggle of Val, a low-income woman from an impoverished Brazilian region that abandons her child to move to Sao Paolo and work as a housekeeper.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Latin-America-Oscar-Bids-Explore-Indigenous-Life-Homosexuality-20150930-0038.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
Twelve Latin American films exploring socio-economic issues, including border politics, homosexuality, domestic work and Indigenous lives will be competing for the 2016 Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film.

Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, México, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Dominican Republic, Uruguay and Venezuela are the countries who hope to bring home the golden statue that has only been won twice by a Latin American country.

With the film “Relatos Salvajes,” Wild Stories, Argentina earned the trophy in 2009 for the second time.

Mexico seeks to break this historical record with “600 miles,” which narrates the story of a young Mexican man that finds himself struggling in the world of arms trafficking between the U.S. and Mexico while under the watchful eye of an agent on the other side of the border.

RELATED: Argentina Creates Indigenous Film School

The often-neglected lives of domestic workers come in the spotlight in the Brazilian film “The Second Mother.” The Oscar hopeful, produced by Anna Muylaert, brings to the screen the struggle of Val, a low-income woman from an impoverished Brazilian region that abandons her child to move to Sao Paolo and work as a housekeeper.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Latin-America-Oscar-Bids-Explore-Indigenous-Life-Homosexuality-20150930-0038.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
Twelve Latin American films exploring socio-economic issues, including border politics, homosexuality, domestic work and Indigenous lives will be competing for the 2016 Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film.

Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, México, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Dominican Republic, Uruguay and Venezuela are the countries who hope to bring home the golden statue that has only been won twice by a Latin American country.

With the film “Relatos Salvajes,” Wild Stories, Argentina earned the trophy in 2009 for the second time.

Mexico seeks to break this historical record with “600 miles,” which narrates the story of a young Mexican man that finds himself struggling in the world of arms trafficking between the U.S. and Mexico while under the watchful eye of an agent on the other side of the border.

RELATED: Argentina Creates Indigenous Film School

The often-neglected lives of domestic workers come in the spotlight in the Brazilian film “The Second Mother.” The Oscar hopeful, produced by Anna Muylaert, brings to the screen the struggle of Val, a low-income woman from an impoverished Brazilian region that abandons her child to move to Sao Paolo and work as a housekeeper.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Latin-America-Oscar-Bids-Explore-Indigenous-Life-Homosexuality-20150930-0038.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Latin-America-Oscar-Bids-Explore-Indigenous-Life-Homosexuality-20150930-0038.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
Twelve Latin American films exploring socio-economic issues, including border politics, homosexuality, domestic work and Indigenous lives will be competing for the 2016 Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film.

Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, México, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Dominican Republic, Uruguay and Venezuela are the countries who hope to bring home the golden statue that has only been won twice by a Latin American country.

With the film “Relatos Salvajes,” Wild Stories, Argentina earned the trophy in 2009 for the second time.

Mexico seeks to break this historical record with “600 miles,” which narrates the story of a young Mexican man that finds himself struggling in the world of arms trafficking between the U.S. and Mexico while under the watchful eye of an agent on the other side of the border.

RELATED: Argentina Creates Indigenous Film School

The often-neglected lives of domestic workers come in the spotlight in the Brazilian film “The Second Mother.” The Oscar hopeful, produced by Anna Muylaert, brings to the screen the struggle of Val, a low-income woman from an impoverished Brazilian region that abandons her child to move to Sao Paolo and work as a housekeeper.



The Dominican Republic opted for “Sand Dollars,” a film that centers a relationship of convenience between a white French woman and a female Dominican sex worker.

The film, its website states, reveals the “contradictions as having to pay for company, to pay to solve everyone’s problems, the wish to belong, to be helpful and useful, and the impotence of not knowing how and to always feel like an outsider.”

The brutal reality of the exploitative relationship between Panama and the United States is brought to life in the documentary “Box 25.” Based on 114 recently discovered letters written by men that built the Panama Canal, the meticulously-researched film documents the intimately personal experiences of torturous working conditions, rampant discrimination, illness as well as these men’s hopes and dreams.



Meanwhile, Venezuela and Colombia sent in two films narrating the lives of Indigenous peoples.

“Embrace of the Serpent” is Colombia’s Oscar hopeful, a story on the forty-year-long search for a sacred healing plant that brings together two U.S. American scientists and an Amazonian shaman who is the last survivor of his tribe.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Latin-America-Oscar-Bids-Explore-Indigenous-Life-Homosexuality-20150930-0038.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
Twelve Latin American films exploring socio-economic issues, including border politics, homosexuality, domestic work and Indigenous lives will be competing for the 2016 Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film.

Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, México, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Dominican Republic, Uruguay and Venezuela are the countries who hope to bring home the golden statue that has only been won twice by a Latin American country.

With the film “Relatos Salvajes,” Wild Stories, Argentina earned the trophy in 2009 for the second time.

Mexico seeks to break this historical record with “600 miles,” which narrates the story of a young Mexican man that finds himself struggling in the world of arms trafficking between the U.S. and Mexico while under the watchful eye of an agent on the other side of the border.

RELATED: Argentina Creates Indigenous Film School

The often-neglected lives of domestic workers come in the spotlight in the Brazilian film “The Second Mother.” The Oscar hopeful, produced by Anna Muylaert, brings to the screen the struggle of Val, a low-income woman from an impoverished Brazilian region that abandons her child to move to Sao Paolo and work as a housekeeper.



The Dominican Republic opted for “Sand Dollars,” a film that centers a relationship of convenience between a white French woman and a female Dominican sex worker.

The film, its website states, reveals the “contradictions as having to pay for company, to pay to solve everyone’s problems, the wish to belong, to be helpful and useful, and the impotence of not knowing how and to always feel like an outsider.”

The brutal reality of the exploitative relationship between Panama and the United States is brought to life in the documentary “Box 25.” Based on 114 recently discovered letters written by men that built the Panama Canal, the meticulously-researched film documents the intimately personal experiences of torturous working conditions, rampant discrimination, illness as well as these men’s hopes and dreams.



Meanwhile, Venezuela and Colombia sent in two films narrating the lives of Indigenous peoples.

“Embrace of the Serpent” is Colombia’s Oscar hopeful, a story on the forty-year-long search for a sacred healing plant that brings together two U.S. American scientists and an Amazonian shaman who is the last survivor of his tribe.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Latin-America-Oscar-Bids-Explore-Indigenous-Life-Homosexuality-20150930-0038.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
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