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Ecuador’s skyscrapers: A photo essay

Ecuador’s skyscrapers: A photo essay

Posted by Juan Gavasa on April 06, 2015

As dawn washes over the icy mountain planes, the hint of a new day floats through the air, and faint sunlight kisses Cotopaxi’s snowy face.

At 19,348 feet, Cotopaxi is Ecuador’s second-highest peak and one of the most active volcanoes in this mountainous country, about the size of Colorado. The best views of Cotopaxi are from the slopes of neighbouring volcanoes such as Antisana, soaring more than 18,700 feet. Climbers come from across the world to ascend these peaks and to witness breathtaking cloud-level landscapes.

At 19,348 feet, Cotopaxi is Ecuador’s second-highest peak and one of the most active volcanoes in this mountainous country. PHOTO: ANNE FARRAR/THE WASHINGTON POST

At 19,348 feet, Cotopaxi is Ecuador’s second-highest peak and one of the most active volcanoes in this mountainous country. [Anne Farrar/The Washington Post]

Dawn’s light exposes a crevasse – potentially deadly to mountaineers – on Antisana’s terrain. Crevasses are caused by glaciers flowing over uneven surfaces. [Anne Farrar/The Washington Post]

Glaciers in the South American Andes, such as this one on Antisana, are melting faster than many scientists predicted, losing land mass due to rising temperatures. [Anne Farrar/The Washington Post]

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